Radio producer

Australian radio producer Jana Hocking reveals why finding love on dating apps is no longer taboo

Only one radio producer, 35, reveals the only reason why most Australians’ ‘tragic’ way of finding love is no longer frowned upon

  • Jana Hocking, 35, thinks finding love on ‘tragic’ dating apps is no longer taboo
  • While it was once newsworthy, she says the concept is now socially acceptable
  • Radio producer insists success hinges on making good dates with bad ones










An unlucky radio producer has revealed why finding love on a dating app is no longer a thing to be laughed at.

While once a source of trivial embarrassment, “Eternal Single” Jana Hocking believes meeting someone through an app is now socially acceptable because “everyone is on them.”

The 35-year-old, who works at Sydney’s Triple M station, says she currently uses two, but would use three if Raya – an exclusive dating app for the rich and famous that doesn’t accept that eight percent of applicants – allowed him to register. .

One-time radio producer Jana Hocking (pictured) says finding love on dating apps is now socially acceptable because “everyone’s on it”

Ms Hocking says she uses apps sporadically, hops on them for a week before becoming disillusioned after a series of bad dates and boring conversations, then logs out for two.

But despite the well-known pitfalls, she insists that there are plenty of “rough diamonds” waiting to be discovered online.

In his weekly column for news.com.auMs Hocking recalled being woken up at the last minute by a Tinder date that said he was experiencing flu-like symptoms and had to take a Covid test.

Undeterred, she slipped out and teamed up with a man who agreed to meet her for a drink at his local pub. They immediately hooked.

Ms Hocking (right, with friend) says success in online dating depends on taking the good with the bad

Ms Hocking (right, with friend) says success in online dating depends on taking the good with the bad

“Before you know it, we ended up sitting in my favorite room with wine in hand,” she wrote.

“I had very few expectations for this date, but within an hour we burst out laughing and had a blast.”

Ms. Hocking urged single women to persevere with dating apps because you never know when your future husband is “close at hand.”

His argument is supported by facts.

Triple M producer (pictured) says more Australians now meet online than in real life

Triple M producer (pictured) says more Australians now meet online than in real life

A recent study from Monash University found that babies born to online romances will soon outnumber children born to parents who have met in real life.

The ‘Future of Dating’ report found that Australians are more likely to slip on apps like Tinder, Hinge or Bumble than to start a conversation offline, with the majority of new couples now meeting through their phones.

Just over 30% meet this way, 17% are introduced through mutual friends, 16% meet at work, 6% at school and 5% on other social media platforms.

Predictions in the report predict that more Australians will meet online than offline by 2040.

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